Home > Military, news, paganism > Pagan Platitudes on 9/11, Etc.

Pagan Platitudes on 9/11, Etc.

I wasn’t planning on making a post about this at all. My thoughts and emotions on that day are very mixed–partly because it happened during a very dark period in my life, and that I ended up witnessing the whole thing start to finish live on television, plus hours and hours of coverage afterward. Most of my family is federal government or military. Since that event my father has been to Afghanistan twice, and is due to return next year in August for his third tour of duty.

As for other topics I was going to cover relating specifically to the “pagan community” at large, Sannion rather sums it up brilliantly in his post, Dii facientes adiuvant. This is quite a refresher from the other various sorts of navel-gazing, “prayer circles”, platitudes and related that I’ve seen circulate as of late.

Plus–and this is something a friend of mine brought up fairly recently–for some people who lost loved ones to this terrible tragedy, the constant harping on 9/11 (which is different from honoring the dead, and learning from/healing from a tragedy or traumatic event) can be psychologically damaging, as it forces them to relive this painful event again and again.

On Sunday, I watched the football game, and drank heavily, and…celebrated life. And yes–of course I remembered. But you won’t find me picking open proverbial scabs, or handwringing or wailing. I will celebrate life, and I will refuse to live in fear, because that, in my opinion, is one damn good way to spit in the faces of those who wish to spread terror, hatred and death.

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  1. September 13, 2011 at 7:30 pm

    I’m glad to hear that someone with a more personal experience of 9/11 feels this way. To me the constant harping on it doesn’t seem particularly productive or healthy, but everyone processes grief in their own ways so I’m reluctant to say anything about it … though I also notice that most of the people doing the harping are the ones who were less directly impacted by it. And regardless, bad theology is bad theology and deserves to be pointed out as such.

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